Home The News Zimbabwe: When indigenous beats becomes hard to resist
Zimbabwe: When indigenous beats becomes hard to resist
News / Latest / Ernest Kanjo / Sunday, 02 May 2010 20:33

MBIRA_PHOTOIf you cherish quiet moments, go to Dzimbanhete. It is a small village situated 25km away from Zimbabwe's capital Harare along the road to Bulawayo. Here, lies a place - Dzimbanhete Arts Interactions. It is a resource centre and meeting point for the country's young and talented artists.

On a late morning visit to this beautiful site, expect to have a good feel of nature's sweet gifts to mankind and a prompt appreciation of art in all its facets. The only good thing, perhaps, that will perturb your knack for a quiet environment, is the sound of the mbira, a Zimbabwean tradition musical instrument. You would however not regret listening to it, for, mbira's melody makes sense to the ear.

Such entertaining traditional sound, accompanied by male voices, percussion beats, clappers (makwa) and fascinating choreography is what Mbira Dzenharo, a Dzimbanhete traditional music band offers. With Edmond Chikanya at the mbira bass, Spencer Chiyangwa and Byron Chikanya at the mbira rhythm, Saiti Maposa at the drums, the band dishes out numerous dance-provoking pieces. ''We have 16 songs compiled in two albums,'' Mbira Dzeharo group manager, Brighton Munemo revealed.

Songs in these albums have been performed throughout Zimbabwe during small events. Mbira Dzenharo performances have always moved potential sponsors to make promises which have unfortunately not be fulfilled. ''We would have taken this group further if people and corporate organisations chipped in their supported,'' Chikanya regretted. Were it not for the Zimbabwe Music Comparative (ZMC) that sponsored studio recording, the groups scintillating pieces would have remained remote. ''We now have our songs on CDs and can widely circulate them if the means are available.''

For now, Mbira Dzenharo is contented with thrilling guests to the Dzimbanhete Arts Interactions and interacting with them, hoping that their little might would some day be a giant contribution to traditional African dance and music. And long after you have driven out of Dzimbanhete, the sounds of mbira stays on your mind.  

  


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